Copyright © Shwe Lu Maung 2001-2018. I reserve all rights in all pages of my website www.shwelumaung.org.  You are free to quote with due acknowledgement under the fair use of copyrights under the US and International copyright laws.

This is my first scientific publication. Sir Brian K. Follett is  my supervisor and mentor. The research was major break through in the avian reproductive endocrinology and photoperiodism.  During my scientific career, I specialize in reproductive endocrinology, biotechnology and molecular genetics.

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It is a mad mad mad world

For freedom, equality and justice? Then, your fight is my fight; your struggle is my struggle

4. My science

 

 

I am a Darwinist. In 1963, I read Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and became a Zoology Honours student at Rangoon University. I used to walk along the Chancellor Road carrying the book and declaring, “I am a Homo sapiens, we’re all Homo sapiens”.  After 1962 coup d'état by General Ne Win and his colonels I became a rebel. Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species has made me clearly understand the science of common humanity. 

 

It was Lecturer Daw Hla Hla May who made me interested in Zoology. She taught me well and made me aware of the fact that zoology is not just about the frogs and earthworms, but more interesting things are there. She was a comparative vertebrate anatomist and she taught me how the skull of a frog evolves into a human skull, which was not in our curriculum. That interested me and one day, from the university library, I checked out Charles Darwin's On the origin of species and read it with great effort. At the beginning, it took me one whole day to finish reading one page. English was one  problem, but the greater problem was the biological terms. But I kept reading with the help a dictionary of biology and Oxford Advanced English dictionary that I had. Within six months, I finished reading the book and I was ready to become a zoologist.

 

I became a scientist with the hope that science will be able to eliminate poverty and hunger in Burma.  However, the military dictatorship made me a rebel. Before retirement, I became a scientist with the hope that science will be able to eliminate poverty and hunger in Burma.  However, the military dictatorship made me a rebel. My dissent and opposition to the military junta greatly compromised my scientific career. Before the retirement, I drifted and worked as a R&D scientist in twelve countries and authored or co-authored more than sixty scientific research articles. I specialized in reproductive endocrinology, biotechnology and molecular genetics. Unexpectedly, I was also caught up in the Muslim-Buddhist religious conflicts. Based on my experiences, I have written six books on Burma.

I specialized in reproductive endocrinology, biotechnology and molecular genetics. Unexpectedly, I was also caught up in the Muslim-Buddhist religious conflicts. Based on my experiences, I have written six books on Burma.

 

My interest lies in the area of “science and civilization”—how science advances civilization and vice versa.  Therefore, I study science and learn the paradigm of civilizations. My interest probably was conditioned by the circumstances in my native land, Burma, where I grew up.

 

My main concern is the becoming of science and technology a powerful tool of oppression and exploitation in the hands of  the governments and  few technocrats and business moguls. In anguish, I watch the commoners  having  minimum, rather very negligible, benefit of the advancement of science and technology while bench working-scientists like myself toils in the laboratories. Scientists across the world are shaped by the need of power and money. Present knowledge of science and technology is fully capable of eliminating poverty and hunger on this planet.  Today's existence of poverty and hunger is purely political. I am sad seeing it.

3. My childhood

4. My science

5. My politics

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